Study Guides – Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table   2 comments

This book, while largely fictional, the story was woven around actual  events occurring in the last week of September, 1927. All the events, technology, transportation systems, prices (as far as possible), culture and historical figures are real. This is a fun and interesting way to experience life in the late 1920’s, and see that this is the decade when women experienced their first liberation and when modern America was born.

Relevant Links for in-depth information on things in the book:

The Algonquin Round Table:  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algonquin_Round_Table

http://www.davidpietrusza.com/Algonquin-Circle-Links.html

http://www.dorothyparker.com/

http://www.algonquinhotel.com/new-york

Independence Hall:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Hall

The Trip to New York: Broad Street Station & The Pennsylvania Railroad:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_Street_Station_%28Philadelphia%29

http://www.rrmuseumpa.org/about/roster/e6.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Station_%28New_York_Ci

me Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table – some fun facts:   Leave a comment

In the book – The journey from Philadelphia to New York on the 9 am Clocker:
  • The Pennsylvania Railroad (known as the Standard Railroad of the World) was the preeminent carrier in that market. They had the only direct access to Manhattan Island thanks to Penn Station. The Reading served the market only as far as Jersey City, (using the Central of New Jersey’s tracks from Bound Brook, NJ) with a ferry connection to downtown New York.
    • Broad Street Station: Opened in the 1880′s modernized in the 1890′s with a huge arched trainshed that burned down in a    spectacular fire in 1923, was the main downtown station for Philadelphia. It was a stub-end station, and was avoided by most thru trains of the Pensylvania as it required a backup move. Thru trains between New York and points west used North Philadelphia station, and trains south used that one and old West Philadelphia station (located just west of today’s 30th Street Station). Broad Street had extensive commuter train service, including the famous Paoli Local, serving the old ‘Main Line’ communities who’s 20 mile 4-track mainline  was electrified by AC overhead wires in 1915. The original round overhead catenary poles still exist today. Broad Street was supplemented by the Suburban Station in 1928, serving only commuter trains, as the grade to the underground station was too steep for locomotive-hauled trains.
      Broad Street Station about 1913.

    • The Clockers: the Pennsylvania’s every hour on the hour trains between Philadelphia and New York’s Penn Station. Each train in the 1920′s took 2 hours, as opposed to 90 minutes starting in the 1930′s after the main line was electrified. The trains had first class parlor cars as well as non-reclining seat, straight back coaches, many had dining cars and club or lounge cars (for smoking and drinking) and many parlor cars also had a buffet or grill. The morning trains out of Philly (according to my 1926 Official Guide) stopped only at Princeton Junction and Manhattan Transfer after leaving the Philly stations behind. The 9 am Clocker had only a club car and parlor car with grill. The overall journey was slower than today in a large part due to the fact that engines had to be dropped at Manhattan Transfer just east of Newark and exchanged for a third-rail powered electric engine to haul it under the Hudson to Penn Station. Manhattan Transfer existed only for that purpose, there was no exit, used only for changing trains and engines. The station was also served by the Hudson Tubes (today’s PATH trains) to Hoboken or Wall Street (Hudson Terminal and its modest twin towers, torn down in 1970 to be replaced by the World Trade Center) and limited service was maintained to the Pennsy’s old Jersey City terminal at Exchange Place ( up until the early 1960′s).
      Typical Pennsylvania Parlor Car of the era

    • The Steam Engines: The E-6 Atlantic: They didn’t call the Pennsy ‘The Standard Railroad of the World’ for nothing. They practiced standardization on a massive scale. The E-6 Atlantic type which was a 4-4-2, that is had four wheels under the cylinders (two axles), four driving wheels (two axles) and two wheels under the large firebox to support the weight of it. This type of engine was an early attempt to get a larger heating surface for the boiler for improved power and hauling capability at high speed. The Atlantic type was already outdated in 1910 by the Pacific type which had an extra pair of driving wheels and longer boiler (4-6-2) when the Pennsy developed the E-6 Atlantic specifically to run short, fast trains on level ground on lines east. They developed this engine using the same massive boiler and square Belpaire firebox with 55 square feet of grate area from a standard freight engine used in low-speed service all over the system by the thousands. The E-6 proved to be wildly successful, and very fast as long as the trains didn’t exceed 10 heavy steel cars. Engine #460, which survives today at Strasburg, PA in the Pennsylvania State Railroad Museum really did hit 115 mph in Maryland hauling the special train with films of Lindbergh’s arrival back in Washington, DC. Trains in those days often exceeded 100 mph if they were late and the track could stand it. There were no federally mandated speed limits.
      The E-6 Atlantic #460 today

    • The K-4 Pacific: The engine the E-6 raced in our story was the Pennsylvania’s pride and joy. First prototype was outshopped in 1914 and tested extensively at Altoona’s test plant then on the road. True to the Pennsy’s standardization, the same boiler for this fast passenger engine was used on a Mikado type freight engine (2-8-2) and they built 600 of those! The K-4 Pacific (4-6-2) was developed oddly enough, as a result of a large experimental demonstrator delivered to the Pennsy in 1911 from American Locomotive Company in Schenectady, NY or ALCO (according to Al Staufer’s Pennsy Power) who was always trying to get a  large contract from the Pennsylvania who mainly built and designed their own at Altoona or used online Baldwin Locomotive in Philadelphia. The demonstrator incorporated a truely massive boiler and firebox for 1911. The Pennsy’s own home-built Pacifics were not satisfactory up until then. They liked what they saw and slide-ruled it into their own design, taking ideas from the E-6 and their own early Pacifics, again using the square French-designed Belpaire firebox (used on almost all Pennsy engines) and the resulting K-4 was wildly successful. They built 425 of them virtually identical between 1914 and 1928. 
    • Penn Station: Pennyslvania’s massive invasion of Manhattan Island was completed in 1910, to the chagrin of its arch-rival the New York Central, hitherto the only other railroad with direct access to the city via Grand Central and its co-tenant the New Haven to Boston and New England. Penn Station’s massive Roman-style temple was an architectural masterpiece with its massive columned facade and underground facilities, still in use today. It had twin tunnels under the mile-wide Hudson, four tunnels to Long Island, used by the then-Pennsy-owned Long Island RR and for trains to Pennsy’s massive Sunnyside Yard. built to service the station and the LIRR. In addition, by 1917, tracks from Penn Station leaped over Long Island Sound via the massive Hell Gate Bridge to connect with the New Haven providing thru service to Boston and New England. This massive infrastructure undertaking as well as the massive system of flyovers and tunnels in the Philadelphia area and Pennsy’s own mainline electrification, (all of which was done with mainly private money)  which was gradually expanded starting in 1928 between NY and Washington by 1933 and Harrisburg by 1938, provided the foundation for today’s Amtrak Northeast Corridor between Washington and Boston.
    • Strange fact: Oddly enough, another bitter competitor between Washington, Philadelphia and New York, the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) used the Pennsylvania’s tracks into Penn Station since the Government’s temporary wartime takeover of the railroads (The United States Railroad Administration) forced the Pennsy to accept the B&O’s trains, and that was still the case at least through 1926 using my reprint of the Official Guide
To find out more, and have some fun along the way, take a walk back in time with us to the last week of September, 1927 to see Babe Ruth hit his record-breaking 60th home run. Hang out with the incomparably witty Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Harpo Marx. Meet Dorothy’s friend, F. Scott Fitzgerald; run into a young and as yet unknown James Cagney, Ben ‘Bugsy’ Siegel, a certain Japanese Navy midshipman and many others.
If you liked ‘Midnight in Paris’ or ‘Boardwalk Empire’ and enjoy Jack Finney’s ‘Time and Again,’ then you might like this book too! Enjoy! Available on Amazon both Paperback and Kindle editions!
Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table Amazon Page

Posted January 2, 2012 by mikeile51 in The BooksEdit

Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table – Kindle Price Reduction!   Leave a comment

Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table’s kindle price was lowered to the ever-popular 99 cents!! (that’s 4,234,320 in 1923 German Reich-marks or 2.50 Qwatloos (See Star Trek) but haven’t sparked any inter-galactic interest so far…)

Enjoy!

More fun facts to come! (How much fun remains strictly subjective – but you could ask the young flapper below:

 

Take a walk back in time with us to the last week of September, 1927 to see Babe Ruth hit his record-breaking 60th home run. Hang out with the incomparably witty Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Harpo Marx. Meet Dorothy’s friend, F. Scott Fitzgerald; run into a young and as yet unknown James Cagney, Ben ‘Bugsy’ Siegel, a certain Japanese Navy midshipman and many others.
If you liked ‘Midnight in Paris’ or ‘Boardwalk Empire’ and enjoy Jack Finney’s ‘Time and Again,’ then you might like this book too! Enjoy! Available on Amazon both Paperback and Kindle editions!
Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table Amazon Page

Posted December 23, 2011 by mikeile51 in The BooksEdit

Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table – some fun facts:   Leave a comment

  • Did the Japanese Navy really visit New York City and their officers attend the Yankees game where Babe Ruth hit his 58th and 59th home runs that Thursday, Sept. 29, 1927?
  • Did Cunard’s Mauretania of 1907 really hold the trans-Atlantic speed record for over 20 years from 1909 to 1929? (both directions)
  • Did steam-powered trains often exceed 100 mph in the 1920′s making up time when running late?
  • Was there sound-on-film BEFORE the ‘Jazz Singer,’ touted as the first ‘Talking Picture,’  was released in November, 1927?  (The Jazz Singer used the less sophisticated Vitaphone sound synchronization system)
Yes – true facts!
To find out more, and have some fun along the way, take a walk back in time with us to the last week of September, 1927 to see Babe Ruth hit his record-breaking 60th home run. Hang out with the incomparably witty Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Harpo Marx. Meet Dorothy’s friend, F. Scott Fitzgerald; run into a young and as yet unknown James Cagney, Ben ‘Bugsy’ Siegel, a certain Japanese Navy midshipman and many others.
If you liked ‘Midnight in Paris’ or ‘Boardwalk Empire’ and enjoy Jack Finney’s ‘Time and Again,’ then you might like this book too! Enjoy! Available on Amazon both Paperback and Kindle editions!
Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table Amazon Page

Posted December 5, 2011 by mikeile51 in The BooksEdit

Kindle and Paperback versions of Time Trippers now fully linked and available on Amazon.   Leave a comment

Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table is now fully available in both paperback and Kindle versions on Amazon.com! It is finished at last.

Since all of the marketing of my humble book has been done ‘bass-ackwards’ I’ll be releasing the press releases by the end of November in time for the Christmas holiday shopping, and setting up some book signing events. Should have done all that before the book was released. Oh well, live and learn.

While the book may appear on the surface to be, “Ho hum, another amateurish, sloppy self-published book brimming with puerile drivel.”  But in fact, its very accurate history (with an MA in History I could hardly do less) and a highly plausible story based on actual events and provides, as I’ve said ad nauseum,  a realistic ‘snapshot’ of life and culture in the Jazz Age, carefully modeled. A CEO of a tech company here in Minnesota found it not only entertaining but he said that he learned a lot about the 1920′s, that it was a more significant decade than he thought, and even suggested that it would make a good movie or should become a radio play for ‘A Prairie Home Companion!’ Nobody was more surprised than myself at this!  So, boys and girls, please check it out. Your support is always appreciated!

Now working on the two sequels as well as my ‘Inspector Tanaka Murder Mystery’ new book project.

Posted October 24, 2011 by mikeile51 in UncategorizedEdit

Time Trippers – The Nights of the Round Table   Leave a comment

Revised, final version available on Amazon.com both in paperback and now on Kindle! The Kindle version sells for $1.99. For now, you have to go the the Kindle Store to get it. Soon both will be linked together, making shopping easier.
Enjoy!

Posted October 13, 2011 by mikeile51 in UncategorizedEdit

Coming soon….   Leave a comment

Posted September 6, 2011 by mikeile51 in UncategorizedEdit

Final version will be available shortly……   Leave a comment

The initial release was deliberately low-key to wait for some feedback from readers, and correct a few egregious punctuation missteps that somehow escaped my all-seeing eye  and that of my editor, plus made a couple of edits eliminating some of my cherished yet verbose parts and a few details needed. Once this edition becomes available, THEN I will issue the  Press Release, and embark on a marketing campaign, now that I’m fully satisfied. Changes are not significant overall, but will put the subtle touch of paprika that was missing from the Goulash (Ooh, I hate Metaphors!).

Posted September 5, 2011 by mikeile51 in UncategorizedEdit

The book is now for sale on Amazon.com and my E-Store!!   1 comment

The book is now for sale on Amazon.com and my E-Store!!

Available at Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Time-Trippers-Nights-Round-Table/dp/1451524412/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1306344154&sr=1-4

Or check my E-Store:

https://www.createspace.com/3437014

Enjoy!

Posted May 20, 2011 by mikeile51 in The Books, UncategorizedEdit

Time Trippers – The Nights of the Round Table   Leave a comment

FINALLY done tweaking…submitted final manuscript – waiting on hard copy and will have final cover soon.

Hope to get it in print by mid-May (I may have to laugh..but you never know…)

Wish me luck!

Posted April 26, 2011 by mikeile51 in The BooksEdit

Editing is DONE!   2 comments

The editing is finally done! (I’ve managed to procrastinate as much as possible, still, got it finished!)

Waiting on the final draft to eyeball the changes then, Talley Ho! To market we go!

Posted April 4, 2011 by mikeile51 in UncategorizedEdit

« Older Entries

Fifth Avenue and the Harlem Renaissance

http://www.42explore2.com/harlem2.htm

Greenwich Village in the 1920s

Battleship New York – BB34

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_class_battleship

http://www.navsource.org/archives/01/34a.htm

The Trip to Chicago: The 20th Century Limited

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20th_Century_Limited

Advertisements

Posted June 15, 2011 by mikeile51

2 responses to “Study Guides – Time Trippers: The Nights of the Round Table

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. I see you have this saying study guide but nothing really shows a study guide. What do you have in your study guide? Is it available for download for the book or how does one get the study guide? Just curious – E 🙂

    The Travelin’ Maven, Ma America (Elysabeth Eldering)
    Author of the JGDS, 50-state, mystery, trivia series

    Where will the adventure take you next?

    http://jgdsseries.blogspot.com
    http://jgdsseries.weebly.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: